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Archive for the ‘How to’s’ Category

Setting up and Delivering a Message with PocketBible on your Kindle Fire (or other Android OS tablet)

Posted on: November 18th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 2 Comments

One of the amazing uses of PocketBible is for delivering a message. It’s layout and features provide an excellent electronic Bible with its own built-in notebook, and it has all the tools you need to prepare your message, whether it’s for the classroom or the pulpit. This tutorial will look at setting up the message in PocketBible and then using the multi-screen feature for preaching and teaching.

Setting up the Message

There are several features of PocketBible that help in preparing sermons and classes. The features I like are Notes, Bookmarks, and Highlights. Here are a few of the ways that I use them together to prepare sermons.

NOTE – PocketBible has a lot of fine tools for the actual sermon prep itself including Bibles, dictionaries, commentaries, study Bibles, books, and more. We’ll go into detail about using them for sermon prep in future posts.

Notes

Tap on the verse where you want to place a note and select the notebook symbol on the Action Bar. In the notes area, you can type or paste in any kind of information you want. You can format your text to make it easy for you to use. Bullets are great for simple outlines. Add things that you want to make sure you remember to say. At the end of the note you can type the next verse. This will create a clickable link so you can quickly navigate to the next verse in your sermon.

Bookmarks

Once you’ve chosen the references you will use, you can bookmark them in a folder just for this message. I like to name the folder with the title I use for the message. If I need to, I can go to the bookmarks list and see every verse that I’m using in my sermon. This list can also be used to navigate to the next verse in your sermon.

Highlighting

This step is optional but I find it easier to see the verses I want to use if I’ve highlighted them. I like to use a different color for different topics. If my message is about the Scriptures, I like to highlight the verses green. This helps when navigating to the next verse. You can find it quicker because you know what color to look for. This is more effective when you’ve only colored the verses in your sermon that color. You might consider using a special color or marking just for this message.

Example


For my sermon I’ve created a bookmark folder called Sermon 001 The Word of God. It contains references to the following verses: Ps 119:11, Ps 119:16, Ps 119:80, Ps 119:89, Ps 119:105, 2Ti 2:15, 2Ti 3:16, 2Ti 3:17, 2Pe 3:16. I’ve colored all of these verse limegreen and each verse has a note with my primary point and a link to the next verse.

Ps 119:11 is the first verse I want to go to. It has a note that talks about the importance of memorizing Scripture. It also has a link to the next verse – Ps 119:16. The note on Ps 119:16 talks about how we should enjoy reading and studying the Scriptures, and how we should keep God on our minds and in our hearts by thinking and meditating on the Word. After this I have typed POINTS TO MAKE followed by two bullets:

  • Love the Word
  • Memorize the Word

After the note is a link to Ps 119:80, which contains a short note and the next reference. I continue this until I reach the end of the message. This can be as detailed or as simple as you want. If another point or verse comes to me during the sermon, I can navigate to it and still have my notes visible so I know where to go next.

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How do I keep my Bible and commentary on the same verse in PocketBible?

Posted on: November 11th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 7 Comments

As you read or study your way through the Bible in PocketBible, you should find that your commentaries are moving in sync with the Bible. In other words, when you are looking at Matthew 25:31 in the Bible, an open commentary that has a comment on this verse should be at that place as well. If you are not seeing this, it may be one of two things:

  • No comment available – The commentary you are viewing does not have a comment on the verse you are looking at in the Bible. Some commentaries are verse by verse. Some are passage by passage. And some items we classify as commentaries, such as Study Bibles, will not comment on every verse or passage.
  • Sync turned off – Keeping your Bible and commentaries in sync on the same verse in PocketBible is an option. It should be on by default in most versions of PocketBible but if a Bible and commentary are not syncing as you’d expect, double-check this option in the settings to make sure it is set correctly. Here’s how to do that in each version of PocketBible:
    • iOS – MENU | SETTINGS | BIBLE SETTINGS – make sure there is a check mark next to “Sync Bibles/Commentaries”
    • Mac OS X – POCKETBIBLE | PREFERENCES | GENERAL – make sure there is a check mark next to “Make all Bibles and commentaries move in response to changes in the active Bible”
    • Android OS – MENU | SETTINGS | PROGRAM SETTINGS – make sure the first item in the list “Bible Synchronization” has a checkmark.
    • Windows Phone and Windows Store – SETTINGS | GENERAL – first option listed, slide “Synchronize Books” to on
    • Windows PC – VIEW | SYNCHRONIZE – click on Synchronize to check mark it (or uncheck mark it).

How to Create Your Own Topical Chain Reference in PocketBible

Posted on: November 1st, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 13 Comments

Topical chains are references that take you to the next verse in a topic. They are great for personal study, devotions, sermon prep, and for teaching or preaching. You can easily create your own topical chain reference in PocketBible. It can be as simple or detailed as you want: anything from a few verses and topics to a complete topical chain reference study Bible.

Bookmarks

PocketBible’s bookmarking feature is one I’ve used for years to aid in memorizing scripture. I now have my entire family’s memory list on my Android. Each person’s list is under their own name (as a category). The ability to maintain multiple bookmark lists is perfect for creating your own topical chain reference list.

Simply select a verse in PocketBible and place the bookmark. Create a new or choose an existing category (or topic) to place the bookmark in and you’re done. Easy. There is no limit to the number of bookmark categories you can create or the number of verses you can have in each category.

Verse Links

The next step on the list is creating your own links. To do this you will use the note feature. Select the verse you want to use in your chain reference and type the reference in a note on that verse. The reference becomes a clickable link. You can create a link to just the next verse or you can include the previous verse if you want your chain to go backwards as well as forwards. For multiple topics or to show more detail, write the topic name along with the reference. An alternative is to copy and paste the verse into the note and then place the reference with the portion of the verse you want it to refer to. Go to each verse in your bookmarks and create your links. (Note: verse reference links can’t be created in the Windows Phone/Windows Store versions of PocketBible at this time but is on our request for consideration in updates to these versions).

Highlighting

Another option is to use the highlighting feature. Each highlight can represent a topic (highlights can be renamed if you have the Advanced Feature Set for the version of PocketBible you are using). There are 19 different highlights which include 16 colors and 3 types of underlining. You can use highlighting as the primary topic and write the names of the subtopics in the notes. Select the verse you want to highlight, and then choose your highlight color.

Reading by Topic

To read the verses in the topics/category, simply review the list of verses you’ve bookmarked or highlighted. Any verse links you have added will show up in the notes attached to the verses in your list. This makes it easy to look through and read every single topic and chain reference in your lists.

Example

One of my favorite topics is the Scriptures themselves. I’ve created a chain that I call The Word of God. My list is not exhaustive, but the beauty of using PocketBible is that you can add to your list as much as you want. Here is the list of verses that appear in my bookmark category, The Word of God:

Psalms 119:11, Psalms 119:16, Psalms 119:89, Psalms 119:103, Psalms 119:105, Psalms 119:130, Proverbs 6:23, Isaiah 40:8, Matthew 5:18, Matthew 24:35, 2 Timothy 2:15, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, 1 Peter 1:25, 1 Peter 2:2, 2 Peter 1:21, 2 Peter 3:15-16

As I come across verses that speak to me about God’s Word I simply add it to the list. I have color-coded these verses green because that’s the color I use for the Scriptures.

Where do you get the verses for the chains?

My favorite place to get the verses is from my own reading. As I come across a verse that I want in a topical list I simply place it there. Another option is to use other Bibles as resources. I do this when I’m studying from Bibles that contain topical lists or chain references. Another choice is using PocketBible for word-searches.

Have you created your own topical chain references in PocketBible? Do you use another feature not included here?

This article is a guest post by Randy Brown, a long-time PocketBible user and owner of the Bible Buying Guide blog.

NOTE: Some of the features mentioned in this article are only available with purchase of the Advanced Features Set for PocketBible. Advanced Feature sets vary and are sold separately for each version of PocketBible.

Scripture Memory with PocketBible

Posted on: October 21st, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 11 Comments

scripture memorySometimes we make things more complicated than they need to be. A friend shared the following article from Awana with me: 10 Steps for Effective Scripture Memory. These 10 steps are actually fairly simple. To summarize, they suggest you: Read it, write it, speak it, hear it, divide it, memorize it, repeat it, recite it with a group, design it and review it. If memorizing Scripture is something you’d like to do, you can easily accomplish several of these steps with PocketBible using the bookmark or highlight feature:

  • Organize – create two bookmark categories for the purpose of memorizing (i.e. Memorize, Review) or choose a highlight color and rename it*.
  • Select – add the verses you are interested in committing to memory to the appropriate category in PocketBible.
  • Review – follow some or all of the steps in the Awana article to commit the verse to memory including reviewing it, reciting it, listening to it*. Once a verse is memorized, move it to your Review bookmark category for more occasional reviewing.

There are so many benefits to memorizing scripture including having the sword of the Spirit always at hand (Ephesians 6:17), helping you to focus on the right things (Philippians 4:8), and keeping you from sin (Psalm 119:9,11).

If you have tips on memorizing verses, please share them in them in the comments below! If you are looking for a dedicated memorization tool to use, consider this free online tool called Memverse.

Note: Some features mentioned above require the purchase of an Advanced Feature set which are currently available for iOS, Windows Phone and Windows Store.

3 Tips for Navigating Your Books in PocketBible

Posted on: October 20th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 26 Comments

Navigating PocketBibleIf you want to explore the contents of a print book, you know to look at the table of contents inside the front cover. When it comes to Bibles, you may be able to flip through and be fairly close to the book of the Bible you are looking for because you are already familiar with the structure of that type of book. But how do you navigate different types of books in PocketBible? Where are the tables of contents?

GoTo = Index/Table of Contents

The key to simple navigation of any type book in PocketBible is the GoTo icon on the toolbar. Most PocketBible users know to tap on this icon if they want to go to a specific place in the Bible–here you can specify Book, Chapter and Verse to move to an exact location. But did you know this same button works similar for other types of books as well (i.e. dictionaries, devotionals and commentaries)?

When you tap on the GoTo icon in PocketBible, it presents you with an index or table of contents based on the book you currently have active. Thus, the navigation options presented change based on the book you are viewing. There are five categories of books in PocketBible:

  • Bibles – you can navigate Bibles by Book | Chapter | Verse.
  • Commentaries – while these books are organized by Bible verse, navigation options will also include links to introductory articles and appendices along with options to drill down to comments on specific Bible books, chapters, passages and verses.
  • Dictionaries – there are two types of PocketBible dictionaries:
    • English dictionaries – navigation is in article order, usually alphabetic but sometimes topical.
    • Greek/Hebrew or Strong’s number based dictionaries – navigation is by Strong’s number. Unless you have Strong’s numbers memorized, it is best to use a Strong’s numbered Bible translation to navigate to a definition as described here: How can I Use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible?
  • Devotionals – navigation is by date. If you tap on the GoTo icon with a devotional active, you’ll be presented with a calendar. If the date is off or you are behind schedule, you can reschedule or start the readings over.
  • Other – the books in this category vary widely by type but one thing is the same for all, tapping on the GoTo icon with this type of book active will still present you with an appropriate index to navigate the book easily.

Searching

A major feature of PocketBible, Searching, lets you quickly find what you’re looking for in PocketBible without navigating an index. Just type in any word or phrase in the search field (look for the magnifying glass on your toolbar) and you’ll be able to choose from a list of places in a book where your search word(s) were found.

Synchronizing Books

Take advantage of PocketBible’s ability to synchronize books automatically and you won’t have to worry about navigating. If you go to John 3:16 in your NIV Bible, all other Bible translations will move to that same verse and your commentaries will move to that verse if they have a comment on it (this option can be turned on/off in PocketBible). Dictionaries will sync by topic/article as well. For example, if you look up the word “Aaron” all open dictionaries will move to their article on Aaron, if applicable. The same if you tapped on a Strong’s number – all open Strong’s numbered dictionaries will move to the article on the active Strong’s number.

A Bonus Tip

A quick way to move between open books is to tap on the title bar of the active window. You’ll get a drop down list of books that are open in that window or pane and you can tap on any book listed to move there. You’ll also see options in the drop down list to close or open books in that window. (Mac and PC users will see tabs for opening and closing books). See a video of this.

Reading Through the Bible: To Plan or Not to Plan

Posted on: October 11th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 2 Comments

PocketBible includes handy features for helping you read through the Bible. We have a variety of Bible reading plans and you can happily track your progress through them. If needed, you can take advantage of the easy-to-use reset and catch up features. However, if you are like me and are more successful at starting Bible reading plans than finishing them, here are some alternatives…some open-ended, do-it-at-your-own pace options for reading through the Bible using PocketBible.

Mark your place with Bookmarks

Create a bookmark category called Daily Reading in PocketBible and simply set/delete bookmarks each time you read to keep your place. You can choose to read the Bible from beginning to end or tackle different parts of the Bible with multiple bookmarks (i.e. Old Testament/New Testament or create your own modified Professor Horner’s Bible Reading System).

Overview Commentaries

While not an official category of commentary, I refer to the following PocketBible commentaries as “overview” commentaries. The type of insight they offer is brief–chapter-by-chapter or less (as noted). They are ideal for guiding you through your reading of the scriptures because you won’t get involved in explanatory detail for any particular passage. With one of these books as your companion, your journey through the Bible can be informed yet open-ended (with no checklists or plans to answer to!).

  • Open Your Bible Commentary – this commentary was written to encourage daily Bible reading and study. It covers the entire Bible chapter-by-chapter (sometimes section by section) with brief explanation and application.
  • Bible Reader’s Companion – gives you a one-page overview for each chapter of the Bible, with key verse and suggested personal application.
  • With the Word Commentary – a chapter-by-chapter handbook on the Bible by Warren Wiersbe.
  • The Bible Book by Book – an overview for each book of the Bible (i.e. summary, outline, key teaching).
  • Ryken’s Bible Handbook – fact sheet and guide for each book of the Bible.

How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible?

Posted on: October 4th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 11 Comments

When it comes to Bible study, a concordance usually refers to one of two things: the concordance in the back of your Bible or Strong’s Concordance.

What is a concordance?

The concordance found in the back of your printed Bible lists common words or phrases in alphabetical order with verse references. You won’t find such a list in the back of your PocketBible Bibles because the built-in search feature replaces it. PocketBible acts as an unlimited concordance allowing you to search for any word or phrase in the Bible and learn where (and how many times) it occurs.

What is Strong’s Concordance?

In the late 1800′s, James Strong decided Bible students needed an exhaustive list of the words used in the Bible and an easier way to tie it back to the original language word. So he assigned a number to every original language word used in the Bible – Hebrew root words used in the Old Testament (8,674) and Greek root words used in the New Testament (5,624). He then went through the King James Version Bible and listed every English word used in that translation. Then he put the two together by assigning an original language word number to each English word so you could see the connection without needing to know Hebrew or Greek.

Along with the original language Hebrew or Greek word, are included a transliteration (so you can pronounce the word) and a brief definition. Over the decades since Strong’s Concordance was first published, others have used his numbers to provide more extensive explanations of the Hebrew or Greek word including W.E. Vine (Vine’s Expository Dictionary) and Spiros Zhodiates (Complete Word Study Dictionaries). Other Bible versions (in addition to the KJV) have used Strong’s numbers to create concordances for their translations. We offer Strong’s-numbered versions of the New American Standard Bible (NASEC) and Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSBEC).

How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible?

With PocketBible, you can view a Strong’s-numbered Bible and tap on the number next to a word to view the definition in any Strong’s-numbered dictionary. This is demonstrated in the video below and explained further in our article on Accomplishing Word Studies in PocketBible.

How to create a customized study Bible in PocketBible

Posted on: September 26th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 1 Comment

When it comes to printed Study Bibles, most take the form of Bible text on the top half of the page and study notes on the bottom half. With PocketBible, you can have a similar setup but customize it in ways you can’t with a printed book.

Bibles and Study Bible Notes (and other commentary) are each sold separately for PocketBible. The print version of a study Bible limits you to a specific Bible translation but you can use any combination of study notes and Bible translation together in PocketBible.

Setup

To accomplish a study-Bible-like setup in PocketBible, simply:

1. Open two panes (or windows) in the PocketBible app
2. Open a Bible translation in the first pane
3. Open a set of study Bible notes (or other commentary) in the second pane
4. If you want your Bible and study notes to sync together (stay on the same verse), make sure you’ve checked that option in PocketBible settings (look for a option that says something like “Sync Bibles/Commentaries”).

Customize

Once you get the basic setup in PocketBible of Bible in one pane and study notes in the other, you are now ready to customize. You can tap on the first pane and open additional Bible translations. And tap on the second pane and open additional study Bible notes or commentary. With multiple translations or commentary open, you’ll be able to easily access additional insight on any verse. Tap on the title bar to easily switch between your open books. Watch a short demonstration video to see how you can use this setup to get more out PocketBible.

How to create a parallel Bible in PocketBible

Posted on: July 3rd, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 5 Comments

Comparing translations of the Bible can provide great insight as you read. In the printed book world, a parallel Bible will display one or more translations of the Bible side-by-side. PocketBible not only mimics this type of book but takes it to a whole new level of flexibility!

At its simplest, you can create a parallel Bible in any version of PocketBible as follows:

1. Open up two panes or windows in the app
2. Open a Bible translation in the the first pane.
3. Open a different Bible translation in the second pane.
4. Make sure you have checked the PocketBible setting to Sync Bibles/Commentaries. This will keep your Bibles (and commentaries) on the same verse at all times. Of course, if you don’t want your two Bibles to be on the same verse, you would simply “uncheck” this option.

The fact that you can vary the Bible translations you are using in PocketBible, makes it more flexible than a printed Parallel Bible. You can also open more windows (up to five on some devices) and compare that many more Bible translations.

iOS users – if you have the Advanced Feature set for PocketBible, you can use Autostudy to instantly view the same verse in ALL your open Bibles.

Did you get a new phone or tablet for Christmas?

Posted on: December 26th, 2013 by Michelle Stramel 7 Comments

Were you the fortunate recipient of a new phone or tablet this Christmas? Congratulations! Here is what you need to know to get PocketBible on it!

First an important reminder – you never have to re-purchase any Laridian Bibles or books when you move to a new device. You may have to re-install a new version of PocketBible (free) and download your books again but we’ll try to make that as painless as possible with the tips in this article.

Find your device type in the list below and follow the instructions from there:

  • iPhone/iPad/iPod touch (iOS) – go to the App Store from your device and search for PocketBible Bible Study. Download the free app and register it using your existing Laridian ID (or email address on file) and password. Tap on the Menu icon and choose Add/Remove Books. Go through the list of your books (should include all your previous purchases and free books) and tap on any you want to download at this time (you can always return to this list and download more later). Hit UPDATE at the top of the page to start the downloads.
  • Android OS – go to the Google Play store on your device (or Amazon App store if you prefer) and search for PocketBible Bible Study. Download the free PocketBible app. Register using your existing Laridian account information. Tap on the Dove icon and choose to Download Books. You should see your previously purchased titles along with all free books. Tap on each book you want to download (you have to do this one at a time). Check out our Android OS videos at our Youtube channel for some tips on using PocketBible for Android.
  • Kindle Fire – we are still working with Amazon to get our Android version of PocketBible to show up in the Kindle Store. In the meantime, follow the instructions at this link to download PocketBible from our site and install as a 3rd party app. HDX owners you can watch a video of how to install.
  • Windows Phone – go to the Windows Marketplace on your phone. Search for PocketBible Bible Study and download and install the free app. Register using your existing Laridian account information. Choose the Cloud Library from the menu. Tap on any title to download. Open downloaded books from the Device Library.
  • Windows Surface – go to the Windows Store on your tablet. Search for PocketBible Bible Study and download and install the free PocketBible app. Register using your existing Laridian account information. Choose the Cloud Library from the menu. Tap on any title to download. Open downloaded books from the Device Library menu.

If you have personal data (i.e. notes, bookmarks, highlights) to transfer, you can synchronize with our server to receive the data to your new device (assumes you have synced to our server/cloud from your old device first to get personal data there). At this time, the Android OS version of PocketBible does not support notes and daily reading progress tracking but those are coming soon (in that order)!

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