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Archive for November, 2011

PocketBible 2.0.3 Now Available on the App Store

Posted on: November 22nd, 2011 by Craig Rairdin 12 Comments

We just heard from Apple saying that 2.0.3 has been approved. You should already be seeing the update in iTunes on your device. We recommend everyone grab this update, as it fixes a few little problems. It also adds a couple of small enhancements that should make the program more enjoyable to use.

If you’re still running 1.4.7 or an earlier version you need to follow the instructions here to get this new version. Version 2.0.3 is not an automatic update to 1.4.7 or any 1.x.x version of PocketBible.


Enhancements

Double-tap on any image to blow it up in a window where it can be zoomed and scrolled. This is handy for maps and some of the detailed charts that appear in some study Bibles and reference books. It works best to go into Settings and tell it to fit images to the screen, then just double-tap them when you want to view them in detail.

If an image has links in it, those links are “hot” in the zoom view. Most images do not have links, but the maps in our Laridian Maps product do.

Books and voices are now marked as “non-purgeable” as they are downloaded. We got some reports that iOS would delete your books if it needed space for another app. This can be disturbing when you discover that books you spent a long time downloading are suddenly gone. By marking these as non-purgeable, Apple promises us they won’t delete them.

Note that while we retroactively mark your existing books as non-purgeable, and that we mark books and voices as non-purgeable as they are downloaded, we do not mark existing voices as non-purgeable due to the complexity of the file structure for voices. If you operate on the edge of available memory and want to make sure your voice files get marked as non-purgeable, you should delete them with Add/Remove Books, then download them again.

If there’s only one book open in a tab, we use that book’s abbreviation as the title for the tab rather than using the book’s category (“Bibles”, “Commentaries”, etc.) as the tab title.

Fixes

On iOS versions prior to 3.2, there were controls to allow you to turn on the tabbed interface even if you didn’t own the Advanced Feature Set. Unfortunately this didn’t really give you the full features of the tabbed interface because the rest of the program would get confused by the fact that you had tabs turned on but did not own the Advanced Feature Set. This version fixes that by hiding those controls.

Printing, emailing, or texting the selected text could crash or do nothing. This has been fixed.

We believe we’ve fixed a problem in which the text window was offset right and up so you could see the gray background behind the text window. This only happened to some users and only under certain circumstances. We could only duplicate it on one of our iPhones. It wasn’t related to which version of iOS you were running or which type of device you had (though I think we only saw it on iPhones and iPod touch devices, not iPads). What it was related to was the version of the development tools we used.

Turns out Apple swapped out a portion of the compiler that converts our Objective-C programming code into the machine code that runs on the phone. The new compiler apparently generates flawed code. (Compare to what happens when an inexperienced translator flubs up the translation of a speech at the United Nations. The original speech is fine but the translation doesn’t say what the original speaker said. That’s what happened to our code. Our code was correct by Apple’s translation of it made the device do something different.) We fixed it by turning off all the special optimizations that the compiler can do for us. Hopefully another programmer will be able to demonstrate this bug in some simple way so Apple can fix it. We were never able to do it reliably, so we couldn’t report it.

As I said, everyone should install this update. You don’t need to re-download your books or voices, nor do you need to sync your personal data after you update. This is just a normal program update that won’t affect anything you’ve downloaded nor any of your notes, highlights, or bookmarks.

New for PocketBible: Dictionary of New Testament Background

Posted on: November 5th, 2011 by Michelle Stramel No Comments

Laridian has released the Dictionary of New Testament Background for use with PocketBible. The Dictionary of New Testament Background offers a wealth of Jewish and Greco-Roman background to enhance your reading and understanding of the New Testament and early Christianity. The dictionary offers:

  • Articles that take full advantage of the flourishing study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and focus on the most important scrolls.
  • Information that encompasses the fullness of second-temple Jewish writings, whether pseudepigraphic, rabbinic, parables, proverbs, histories or inscriptions.
  • Articles on aspects of Jewish life and thought, including family, purity, liturgy and messianism.
  • Covers the full scope of Greco-Roman culture with articles ranging across language and rhetoric, literacy and book culture, religion and cults, honor and shame, patronage and benefactors, travel and trade, intellectual movements and ideas, and ancient geographical perspectives.

Written by acknowledged experts in their fields, this wealth of knowledge of the New Testament era is carefully aimed at the needs of contemporary students of the New Testament.

The InterVarsity Press Dictionary of New Testament Background sells for $39.99 and is available for use with PocketBible for iPhone/iPad/iPod touch, Windows PC, and Windows Mobile.

New for PocketBible and MyBible: Ryken’s Bible Handbook

Posted on: November 3rd, 2011 by Michelle Stramel No Comments

Laridian has released Ryken’s Bible Handbook for use with MyBible and PocketBible. Ryken’s Bible Handbook gives you a quick overview of every book in the Bible. Author Leland Ryken’s distinctive trait is a literary approach to the Bible—understanding the Bible as literature. Ryken and the book’s two other authors help shed light on understanding the Bible as the inspired Word of God and as literature by looking at the Bible’s different literary genres: poetry, narrative, wisdom literature, story, parables, and more.

If you are wondering how this approach could help you understand and/or explain the Bible to others, here are links to three interesting and informative reviews of the book:

Ryken’s Bible Handbook sells for $14.99 and is available for use with PocketBible for iPhone/iPad/iPod touch, Windows PC, and Windows Mobile and MyBible for Palm OS.

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