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Accomplishing Word Studies in PocketBible

Posted on: July 11th, 2011 by Michelle Stramel 11 Comments

With PocketBible and the right set of Bibles and books, you can easily study the meaning of words used in the Bible. This can add some great insight into your Bible study especially when you are focusing on a specific verse.

It is also the case that we occasionally receive emails from PocketBible users who are having trouble figuring out how to use this feature or who have purchased more or less than they need to do word studies. If you think this type of research might be something you are interested in, consider this to be some “inside” information for you in that regard.

What to purchase?

First you need a Bible with Strong’s numbers. We offer three choices:

  1. KJV with Strong’s Numbers and Greek/Hebrew Dictionaries (KJVEC) – this gives you the King James Version Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off) and a basic Greek and Hebrew Dictionary.
  2. NASB with Strong’s Numbers and Greek/Hebrew Dictionaries (NASEC) – this gives you the New American Standard Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off) and a basic Greek and Hebrew Dictionary.
  3. HCSB with Strong’s Numbers (HCSBEC) – this gives you the Holman Christian Standard Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off). It does NOT include definitions.

The Strong’s numbers in these Bibles allow you to link to definitions in the included dictionaries as well as other Strong’s number-based dictionaries. In considering which one to buy, you first want to think about the translations offered. Is there one you prefer over the others? If not, keep in mind that the KJVEC and NASEC include a dictionary. The HCSBEC doesn’t. Also, the dictionaries do differ. I find that the KJVEC definitions focus more on the meaning of the word while the NASEC definitions focus more on how (and how many times) the word is translated in the Bible.

Each of the exhaustive concordances previously mentioned can be used with our dictionaries that are keyed to Strong’s numbers. All of which offer more detailed descriptions of words than the dictionaries included with the KJVEC and NASEC. In the interest of brevity, I won’t go into detail about each one but you can click the book name below for more information from our store.

  1. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words
  2. New Strong’s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words
  3. Complete Word Study Dictionaries

I’m no biblical scholar, so I offer the following purchase recommendations as a fellow PocketBible user. After purchasing the NASEC or KJVEC, if you find you’d like more in-depth information about words, Vine’s is a great deal. It covers Old and New Testament words with great detail and has been a trusted resource for many over the years. If you have the budget for it, the Complete Word Study Dictionaries are excellent and the bundle of the OT/NT gives you in-depth coverage for the entire Bible.

Finally, if you purchase the KJVEC, you may want to skip the New Strong’s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words because the dictionaries in each are similar.

How to use

We’ve written in the past about how to use Strong’s numbers and of course it is covered in the PocketBible Help but it is a subject worth revisiting. If you are using PocketBible for Windows, PocketBible for Windows Mobile, or MyBible for Palm OS, you’ll find step by step instructions for usings Strong’s here. I’m going to use the iPhone in my examples in this article but the principles for other versions of PocketBible are similar.

  1. Open the PocketBible program.
  2. Open the NASEC or KJVEC Bible.
  3. Make sure the Strong’s Numbers are turned on. If they are not, tap and hold anywhere on the Bible and a menu will pop up with an option to turn Strong’s numbers on.
  4. Tap on any Strong’s Number and a dictionary will open with a definition for this number. If you own only the NASEC or KJVEC, the accompanying dictionary will open. If you own other dictionaries, you can go into settings to set up a preferred dictionary for Hebrew and Greek so that your favorite will always open up first. You can also open up two panes and put the Bible in one pane and your dictionary in the other.

Do you already use these tools in PocketBible? Please feel free to share your comments and tips with other users in the comments.

11 Responses

  1. Tom Law says:

    Michelle,

    Are those 4 dictionaries the only ones that are keyed to strong’s numbers or are all the dictionaries that Laridian sells keyed to strongs?

    Thanks so much for your article it will help me study better!!
    -tom

  2. Tom, yes, these four are the only ones we sell that are keyed to Strong’s numbers. The other dictionaries we offer are English word-based and thus are alphabetically indexed.

    Michelle

  3. Tom Law says:

    Thanks Michelle!!

    You note that if you have the KJVEC you might want to skip the New Strong’s Dictionary.

    I have the NASEC. Would the same apply here?

    Again your books are helping me so much,
    -tom

  4. Tom, I don’t think so. I find the New Strong’s has expanded definitions from the NASEC dictionary. They are more brief than the other dictionaries I mention but would I think still be valuable to use with the NASEC.

    Michelle

  5. Tom Law says:

    Michelle,

    Thank you. I will probably buy Strong’s and one of the others too.

    Your help is appreciated,
    -tom

  6. Clinton Meharry says:

    I have appreciated the greek and hebrew defintions and the ability to search where those greek and hebrew words are used elsewhere. Sometime i hope Laridian would offer something that would show a little more detail related to the greek and hebrew – like what verb tense a word is. I realize more expensive desktop versions have that, but I can always hope for Laridian to offer it sometime. I have used Laridian for quite a few years and was glad when a desktop version was added. I have recently switched from windows mobile to android and am waiting for it to come out. I appreciated the pre-release version and have downloaded a couple of translations. Thank you for your good work in the midst of some of the challenges you have faced recently.

  7. C P Lee says:

    Hi. Is there any updates on pocketable for Windows Phone 7 platform ?

  8. Joseph Ronk says:

    I have run into a problem with Vines. I was at 1 John 3:8, the strongs number for ‘destroy’ as in “The Son of God appeared for this purpose, to destroy the works of the devil.” is G3089, when I click on that to go see in vines, it takes me to G2806, I confirmed this problem in both ipocketBible and Pocket Bible for Windows.

    Be Blessed,
    Joseph Ronk

  9. Scott Thornton says:

    I too have finally made the full switch to Android – but with the help of an app called, StyleTap. This app, although expense, allows Palm OS apps to run on Anroid – all of them except the ones that you have to sync.

    Laridian’s Bible in my opinion is much better on Palm OS at the time of this writing than Android. Because of that, it was worth for me to purchase StyleTap ($50) so I could use MyBible and all of my translations, commentaries & etc in a Palm OS environment on my Android Phone.

    For the record, I have nothing to do with StyleTap other than the fact that I use it. I’ve been using Craig Rairdin’s QuickVerse since 1993 when it was in Dos and then added MyBible with my first Palm shortly after I got one in 1998 & have been using MyBible from Laridian ever since (as well as still using QuickVerse 4.0 on my PC).

    You can check out StyleTap at styletap.com.

    My prayers have gone up for Craig and the Laridian group since the passing of Jeff Wheller. May God continue to bless your work and ministry!

    Scott Thornton

  10. Christine Wilcock says:

    Thank you so much for the Android Bibles and the Strong concordance. I use these constantly. What a blessing! !

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