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Posts Tagged ‘Strong’s Concordance’

PocketBible 1.2.0 for Mac OS X Available

Posted on: March 28th, 2016 by Craig Rairdin No Comments

We released an update to PocketBible for OS X today primarily to address some issues that came to light with the release of Deluxe Bible Maps and Timelines. While we were in there we made a few other little adjustments.

The main difference you’ll see is when viewing large images. Previously, large images would bleed off the right edge of the pane, requiring side-to-side scrolling. This worked fine but it made it hard to see the whole image. Version 1.2.0 resizes images so they fit in the width of the pane. If you make the pane wider, the image is re-sized to fit.

Perhaps of more interest are a couple little behavioral tweaks I’ve been meaning to make for a while. First, Advanced Feature Set owners will notice that I’ve extended the hover behavior so that hovering over a Bible link in your notes will show the verse in a pop-up preview window. This is the same behavior you already have for links in books. You’ll also notice that the preview pop-up now uses the same font and size as you have selected for your books instead of using the default font and size provided by OS X. For those of you who like larger print, the small print in the preview pop-up was kind of hard to read.

Second, I’ve added a separate color and underline setting for Strong’s numbers. This allows us to display Strong’s numbers in a slightly lighter shade of the text color so that they’re still readable, but don’t interfere as much with reading the text. And being able to turn off the underline just makes the text look cleaner.

Finally, I’ve made some changes to how we handle the clipboard when you copy an image. Previously we put both the image and an HTML image tag on the clipboard. This allowed programs like PowerPoint that understand images to get the image directly while permitting programs like our note editor to get the same image in the form of a snippet of HTML. Unfortunately, we discovered that the HTML version was confusing a number of other programs (in particular, the Office apps), causing some to refuse to paste and others to go through some kind of weird, paranoid security dance. Hopefully this will work better.

Narrow Your PocketBible Searches With Strong’s Numbers

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Michelle Stramel 5 Comments

Two of the major features of Strong’s Concordance are that it provides an exhaustive list of the words used in the Bible and it links those words back (via the assigned number) to the original language root. If you add Strong’s Concordance to PocketBible, you can search for occurrences of the root word in the Bible using its Strong’s number. We offer three versions of Strong’s Concordance for use with PocketBible: KJVEC, NASEC and HCSBEC.

What is the benefit of using Strong’s Numbers in my searches?

Some things are not apparent in the English translation.

For example, in John 21, Jesus asks Peter three questions, “son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these?” (v15); “son of Jonas, lovest thou me?” (v16); “son of Jonas, lovest thou me?” (v17). While the KJV translates “lovest” the same each time, Strong’s assigns a different root word to Jesus’ first two uses of “lovest.” Strong’s indicates a root word of agapao (which is assigned the number 25) in the first two questions and then phileo ( which is assigned the number 5368) to that last use of “lovest.” When Peter responds to Jesus’ questions, each time he he uses the word phileo (G5368) to convey his feelings for Jesus.

You could look at the definitions for these Strong’s words and find out what others say about the meaning of these two words. But you could also explore these words in context for yourself with PocketBible. How are these two forms of love used elsewhere in the New Testament? How were they used by Jesus and Peter elsewhere? While your dictionaries may cite some verses where these words are used, the PocketBible search feature will provide you with an exhaustive list of usage.

How can I use Strong’s Numbers in my PocketBible searches?

Simply input the Strong’s number (i.e. G25 or H157) into the PocketBible search field to search for occurrences of that word in a Strong’s-numbered Bible.

To continue with our example, let’s use the PocketBible search feature to find out more about the word “lovest.” The search results presented below are from the KJV and the search is limited to the New Testament since we are talking about a Greek word. The bolded text is what is entered in the search field in PocketBible (or the syntax needed to get the results mentioned).

  • lovest – PocketBible reports this specific word form occurs 4 times in the KJV New Testament (KJVNT)
  • lov* – a second search (with a wild card) tell us that there are 202 variations of the word lov* that occur in KJVNT. The asterisk that follows the letters “lov” is a wildcard which tells PocketBible to search for all endings of the word (wildcards are not needed in the Android and Mac versions of PocketBible as they automatically report all word variations).
  • G25 – 109 verses in the KJVNT use this Greek word with the Strong’s number 25 (which we know from our dictionary means agapao).
  • G5368 – 21 verses in the KJVNT use this Greek word with the Strong’s number 5368 (which we know from our dictionary means phileo).

Thus we now know that while a form of the word “love” is used 202 times in the New Testament, only 109 of those times is the root word agapao and 21 times, phileo. That really doesn’t tell us much except to say that G25 is more commonly used in the New Testament. Given that we also want to know context for these words and how Jesus used them, we could re-run our searches and limit them to the Gospels. From there we could browse through the list to consider how these words were used in the reported verses.

For example, PocketBible reports that G5368 is assigned to the word “kiss” in Luke 22:47, referring to Judas kiss. In addition, G5368 is the root used for the word “loveth” in John 5:20 – “For the Father loveth (G5368) the Son…” So phileo is the root word used for Judas kiss and also to describe how the Father loves the Son. Hmm…this is the time I would be checking Vine’s or the Complete Word Study Dictionary to see what they have to say on this.

You can also use PocketBible to find a particular English word only when it’s translated from a specific Greek or Hebrew word. For example, love:G5368 will find all instances of the word “love” where it is translated from the Greek word 5368. To find a particular English word only when it’s not translated from a specific Greek or Hebrew word, using the format, love:-g5368, will find all instances of the word “love” where it is not translated from the Greek word 5368. To find a particular Greek or Hebrew word only when it’s not translated as a particular English word, using the format, -love:g5368, will find all instances of the Greek word number 5368 where it is not translated into English as “love.” This last search should give us Luke 22:47 where g5368 was used for the English word kiss (as we found above).

Related articles: Accomplishing Word Studies in PocketBible, How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible? and Shortcuts for turning on/off Strong’s Numbers in PocketBible Bibles.

How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible?

Posted on: October 4th, 2014 by Michelle Stramel 11 Comments

When it comes to Bible study, a concordance usually refers to one of two things: the concordance in the back of your Bible or Strong’s Concordance.

What is a concordance?

The concordance found in the back of your printed Bible lists common words or phrases in alphabetical order with verse references. You won’t find such a list in the back of your PocketBible Bibles because the built-in search feature replaces it. PocketBible acts as an unlimited concordance allowing you to search for any word or phrase in the Bible and learn where (and how many times) it occurs.

What is Strong’s Concordance?

In the late 1800’s, James Strong decided Bible students needed an exhaustive list of the words used in the Bible and an easier way to tie it back to the original language word. So he assigned a number to every original language word used in the Bible – Hebrew root words used in the Old Testament (8,674) and Greek root words used in the New Testament (5,624). He then went through the King James Version Bible and listed every English word used in that translation. Then he put the two together by assigning an original language word number to each English word so you could see the connection without needing to know Hebrew or Greek.

Along with the original language Hebrew or Greek word, are included a transliteration (so you can pronounce the word) and a brief definition. Over the decades since Strong’s Concordance was first published, others have used his numbers to provide more extensive explanations of the Hebrew or Greek word including W.E. Vine (Vine’s Expository Dictionary) and Spiros Zhodiates (Complete Word Study Dictionaries). Other Bible versions (in addition to the KJV) have used Strong’s numbers to create concordances for their translations. We offer Strong’s-numbered versions of the New American Standard Bible (NASEC) and Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSBEC).

How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible?

With PocketBible, you can view a Strong’s-numbered Bible and tap on the number next to a word to view the definition in any Strong’s-numbered dictionary. This is demonstrated in the video below and explained further in our article on Accomplishing Word Studies in PocketBible.

Accomplishing Word Studies in PocketBible

Posted on: July 11th, 2011 by Michelle Stramel 15 Comments

With PocketBible and the right set of Bibles and books, you can easily study the meaning of words used in the Bible. This can add some great insight into your Bible study especially when you are focusing on a specific verse. Here are some tips on what you need to add to PocketBible to perform a word study and then how to do this type of research.

What to purchase?

The first thing you need is a Bible with Strong’s numbers. We offer three choices:

  1. KJV with Strong’s Numbers and Greek/Hebrew Dictionaries (KJVEC) – this gives you the King James Version Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off) and a basic Greek and Hebrew Dictionary.
  2. NASB with Strong’s Numbers and Greek/Hebrew Dictionaries (NASEC) – this gives you the New American Standard Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off) and a basic Greek and Hebrew Dictionary.
  3. HCSB with Strong’s Numbers (HCSBEC) – this gives you the Holman Christian Standard Bible text with embedded Strong’s numbers (which you can turn on or off). It does NOT include definitions but you can link to our other Strong’s numbered dictionaries as mentioned below.

The Strong’s numbers in these Bibles allow you to link to definitions in the included dictionaries as well as other Strong’s number-based dictionaries. In considering which one to buy, you first want to think about the Bible translations offered. Is there one you prefer over the others? If not, keep in mind that the KJVEC and NASEC include a dictionary. The HCSBEC doesn’t. Also, the dictionaries do differ. I find that the KJVEC definitions focus more on the meaning of the word while the NASEC definitions focus more on how (and how many times) the word is translated in the Bible.

Each of the exhaustive concordances previously mentioned can be used with our dictionaries that are keyed to Strong’s numbers. All of which offer more detailed descriptions of words than the dictionaries included with the KJVEC and NASEC. In the interest of brevity, I won’t go into detail about each one but you can click the book name below for more information from our store.

  1. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words
  2. New Strong’s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words
  3. Complete Word Study Dictionaries

I’m no biblical scholar, so I offer the following purchase recommendations as a fellow PocketBible user. After purchasing the NASEC or KJVEC, if you find you’d like more in-depth information about words, Vine’s is a great deal. It covers Old and New Testament words with great detail and has been a trusted resource for many over the years. If you have the budget for it, the Complete Word Study Dictionaries are excellent and the bundle of the OT/NT gives you in-depth coverage for the entire Bible.

Finally, if you purchase the KJVEC, you may want to skip the New Strong’s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words because the dictionaries are noticeably similar.

How to use

We’ve written in the past about how to use Strong’s numbers and of course it is covered in the PocketBible Help but it is a subject worth revisiting. If you are using PocketBible for Windows, PocketBible for Windows Mobile, or MyBible for Palm OS, you’ll find step by step instructions for usings Strong’s here. I’m going to use the iPhone in my examples in this article but the principles for other versions of PocketBible are similar.

  1. Open the PocketBible program.
  2. Open the NASEC or KJVEC Bible.
  3. Make sure the Strong’s Numbers are turned on. If they are not, tap and hold anywhere on the Bible and a menu will pop up with an option to turn Strong’s numbers on.
  4. Tap on any Strong’s Number and a dictionary will open with a definition for this number. If you own only the NASEC or KJVEC, the accompanying dictionary will open. If you own other dictionaries, you can go into settings to set up a preferred dictionary for Hebrew and Greek so that your favorite will always open up first. You can also open up two panes and put the Bible in one pane and your dictionary in the other.

Related articles: How can I use Strong’s Concordance in PocketBible? and Shortcuts for turning on/off Strong’s Numbers in PocketBible Bibles.

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